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Tag: Rolex

Ah, February. The season for roses, candies, and copious bottles of fine wine to celebrate romance. And while those traditional symbols of Valentine’s Day are wonderful in their own right, we also believe that the deepest, most lasting, most meaningful relationships should be commemorated with something as enduring as your love.

Here, we’ve picked out a few of our favorite pairings— so this season, you can wear your heart on your sleeve, and on your wrist.

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Rolex Cosmograph Daytona 1988

Quiz: Which Luxury Watch Are You?

Watch lovers know every timepiece has its own distinct personality. So which one best embodies yours? Take our watch personality quiz to find out.

#4 Corvette Racing, Corvette C7.R, GTLM; Oliver Gavin (GBR), Tommy Milner (USA), Marcel Fassler (CHE), #78 Jackie Chan DCR JOTA, ORECA LMP2, P; Ho-Pin Tung (CHN), Antonio Felix da Costa (PRT), Alex Brundle (GBR), Ferdinand Habsburg-Lothringen (AUT), #64 Scuderia Corsa, Ferrari 488 GT3, GTD; Bill Sweedler (USA), Sam Bird (GBR), Townsend Bell (USA), Frank Montecalvo (USA)

On January 26, 2019, some of the world’s most skilled drivers will compete for the title of the best of the best in North America’s pre-eminent endurance race, the Rolex 24 at Daytona.

This year marks the race’s 57th anniversary, and Rolex’s 27th year as its official timekeeper, though its connections to Daytona go back to the early 20th century: British motorist and author Sir Malcolm Campbell’s 1935 land speed record, for example, was set on Daytona’s beach with a Rolex on Campbell’s wrist. In 1992, ties between the race and Rolex were formalized when the latter became the Official Timepiece and Title Sponsor of the day-long challenge.

Practice #4 – Drivers take their position for the start of practice

Held during the depths of winter, 13 of the race’s eponymous 24 hours will be held in darkness, with each driver’s abilities in pace control, traffic management, pit strategy, and changeovers being challenged as they navigate the steep banking of the 5.73-kilometer course of the Daytona International Speedway. Each team competes to be the first to complete the previously-set record of over 800 laps.

Five-time race winner and friend of Rolex Scott Pruett—who retired following the 2018 edition—serves as the Grand Marshal for this year’s race, kicking off the grueling race with the iconic words, “Drivers, start your engines.”

The driver that emerges victorious will receive a Rolex Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona to commemorate their exceptional sporting achievement. “Rolex and Daytona are inextricably linked. To be presented a watch engraved with the word ‘Winner’ after 24 hours of intense racing is a moment that lives with you forever,” shares Pruett. “Your Rolex is a constant reminder of the perseverance and hard work that goes into succeeding at the highest level. Every driver who competes at Daytona is racing for the ultimate reward – a Rolex watch.”

Here’s Why The Crown Is The Unsung Hero Of Watchmaking (And Why Rolex Wears The Crown) (via Quill & Pad)

  • When was the last time you thought about your watch crown? Ooooh-ed and Aaaaahhh-ed over a crown innovation? There’s so much more to this tiny part of watchmaking, though, and its functions—and aesthetics—have evolved over the centuries.

Your Supercar and Watch Now Have More in Common Than You Ever Imagined (via Robb Report)

  • Carbon fiber is taking the next step in its evolution as a material, transcending simple aesthetics, pushing watch designers to think of it in new ways, and even challenging the watch industry’s criteria for certification.

 

Breitling’s CEO Georges Kern On Strategy To Survive In The Digital World (via Indonesia Tatler)

  • If you’re on Instagram and have a penchant for timepieces, chances are you follow Breitling CEO Georges Kern. Here, he shares his thoughts on the value of watch fairs, speaking to a new audience, and melding history and modernity.

 

Minimalism may be in, but watchmakers will always take pride in showing off their artistry through visually striking pieces. From hand engraving and sculpting to unique jewelry settings and enamel art, artisans apply all kinds of techniques to turn timepieces into wearable works of art. These are the watches for people who aren’t afraid to make a statement.

Roger Dubuis Excalibur Knights of the Round Table III

 

Arthurian legend meets 21st century art in this stunning piece from Roger Dubuis. King Arthur’s valiant knights come to life as pink-gold low poly figurines who point their glistening swords at an Avalon-inspired table sculpted from solid blue enamel blocks. This scene is framed by an imposing pink-gold case with a fluted bezel.

The Excalibur Knights of the Round Table III houses a self-winding Calibre RD 821 with a 48-hour power reserve.

 

Jaeger-LeCoultre Rendez-Vous Celestial

 

 

Astrology lovers and New Age romantics will love this timepiece, which features a celestial map tracking the constellations’ movements across a hand-painted lapis lazuli sky. Its deep blue and purple hues take inspiration from the aurora borealis, and are complemented by a bezel set with gorgeous sapphires and diamonds. A star running along the circumference of the dial acts as a rendez-vous indicator—just use the crown to set it to the appointed hour of your meeting.

The Rendez-Vous Celestial runs on a Jaeger-LeCoultre 809/1 automatic movement with a 40-hour power reserve.

 

 

Patek Philippe 5077/101 “Birds and Clouds”

 

Birds take flight against a backdrop of white gold clouds and a blue lacquer sky in this piece from Patek Philippe’s latest Rare Handcrafts collection. A guilloché sunburst radiating from 6 o’clock adds depth to the dial, while hand-engraved feathers adorn rose gold dauphin hands. Diamond indices complement the bejeweled bezel and lugs.

One can admire the caliber 240 ultra-thin self-winding movement through the sapphire-crystal case back. The movement has a power reserve of at least 48 hours.

Rolex Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona in Everose Gold

The Rolex “Rainbow” Daytona has been much coveted since it was revealed at Baselworld 2018. Apart from its eye-catching sapphire-encrusted bezel, its dial features 11 baguette-cut sapphire hour markers to match. Its lugs and crown guard are set with 56 brilliant-cut diamonds as well, and its case and bracelet are made of 18 ct Everose gold. We particularly like the unique finish on the pink gold crystal chronograph counters.

Like any other Rolex, this timepiece isn’t just about looks: its Oyster case is guaranteed waterproof up to 100 meters or 330 feet, ands its winding crown is fitted with a Triplock triple waterproofness system. The Rainbow Daytona runs on a Calibre 4130 self-winding mechanical chronograph movement with a 72-hour power reserve.

 

 

Vacheron Constantin Metiers d’Art Les Aerostiers Bagnols 1785

 

Long before the Wright Brothers invented the first successful airplane, the people of France dreamed of flight. Vacheron Constantin Métiers d’Art Aérostiers collection celebrates five historical hot air balloon flights undertaken in France in the 1780s. Our favorite? The Bagnols 1785, which features an ornate hot air balloon hand-engraved and microsculpted from yellow and white gold. It appears to float against a whimsical plique-à-jour enamel dial in various shades of blue.

Its disc displays include hours, minutes, day of the week, and date, all run by the self-winding Manufacture Calibre 2460 G4/1. It has approximately 40 hours of power reserve and is water resistant to 3 bar or 30 meters.

 

 

Hublot Big Bang Mr. Brainwash

 

Not all maximalist watches need to be covered in glittering jewels. In 2015, street artist Mr. Brainwash (also known as Thierry Guetta) worked his magic on a Hublot Big Bang Unico 45, resulting in an acrylic paint-splattered timepiece that was literally a wearable work of art. Needless to say, we don’t recommend you do the same to your watches.

Audemars Piguet Diamond Outrage


Nothing says maximalist like a cuff watch that looks like it could cut you. The third and final piece in Audemars Piguet’s Haute Joaillerie trilogy, Diamond Outrage is for the fabulous woman who is not to be messed with. Its bracelet is adorned with striking diamond-encrusted spikes of varying sizes, resulting in an explosion of glittering stalactites on the wrist.

Its quartz movement is housed in an 18-carat white gold bracelet entirely set with diamonds, with a mirror polished dial and blackened gold hands.

 

 

Breguet Be Crazy

 

As the house that created the very first wristwatch for the Queen of Naples in 1810, and counted Marie Antoinette, Empress Josephine, and Queen Victoria among its clientele, it’s no surprise that Breguet continues to produce watches fit for royalty. Case in point: the Breguet Be Crazy wrist watch, which features over 70 carats of baguette diamonds. Here’s the breakdown: Over 1,000 mobile diamonds set into the caseband, 57 diamonds in the flange, 133 diamonds in the dial, and over 200 diamonds set into the bracelet.

The case, dial, and bracelet are made of 18-carat white gold. With such an impressive watch, Breguet could easily have gotten away with using a quartz movement. However, the Be Crazy watch houses a self-winding Breguet Cal. 586/1, which has a 38-hour power reserve and can be viewed through a sapphire-crystal caseback.

 

 

Have you ever wondered how the different parts and functions of your watch came to be? Here are some notable brands and figures that have pushed the boundaries of watchmaking.

 

Luminor Marina 1950 3 Days PAM 1312 watch parts

Panerai – Crown Bridge

An external feature you can identify from afar, the crown bridge is a signature Panerai design feature, and is still regarded as one of the most ingenious inventions in watchmaking. Mostly seen on divers’ and pilots’ watches, Panerai’s patented crown bridge has inspired and been reimagined by other companies, which pay homage to the functionality and design of the iconic original.

Vulcain 50s President's Watch Cricket President 160151.325L watch parts

Vulcain – Internal Alarm

Only a few watch brands have this interesting, quirky function in their designs. Of these, Vulcain is the least popular, but this watch brand boasts a number of historical and noteworthy novelties—for example, the Presidents watch with the cricket alarm calibre. Though not the first to introduce the concept, Vulcain is credited for being the first to have a fully functional alarm strong and loud enough to wake its wearer.

George Daniels Four-Minute Tourbillon Wristwatch watch parts

George Daniels – Co-Axial Escapement

George Daniels has created some of the most extraordinary and technically advanced watches ever, and the Co-Axial escapement is a testament to his mastery of watchmaking. Daniels redesigned the Swiss lever by adding another escape wheel, resulting in its increased efficiency. It creates less friction, meaning the life of the movement is prolonged due to the absence of wear and tear.

Louis Moinet Memoris Chronograph watch parts

Louis Moinet – Chronograph Function

For years, Nicolas Rieussec was considered the inventor of the chronograph… until 2013 when the Louis Moinet pocket chronograph was discovered and history was rewritten. According to historians, Moinet created the modern chronograph in 1816, seven years before Rieussec famously created a chronograph for King Louis XVIII. Today, Rieussec is credited with developing the first commercialized chronograph and for coining the term.

Breguet Classique Tourbillon Extra-Plat Automatique 5367 watch parts

Breguet – Tourbillon

Some of the most thought provoking creations in horology came from Abraham-Louis Breguet, and the most exquisite of all is arguably the tourbillon, which acts as a deterrent against the effects of the Earth’s gravitational pull. Since the tourbillon was invented for pocket watches, it ensured that while in a upright position, most likely inside the pocket, the escapement rotates to counteract the positional errors caused by being stuck in the same position. Now that wristwatches are de rigeur, we are the tourbillon, thanks to our constant movements, making the complication a beautiful, albeit less than practical, feature in watches.

Rolex Oyster Perpetual watch parts

Rolex – Perpetual Winding and Water/Dust Proof Case

Because of all their technical innovations in watchmaking, many of which are still widely used today, Rolex’s reputation is held in high esteem by many watch aficionados. From improving on John Harwood’s original invention of the automatic winding movement which, admittedly, had limitations, to the water/dust proof case, embodied most prominently by the brand’s Oyster. Many features now taken for granted trace their early days back to the Swiss manufacture, thanks to Rolex’ spirit of ingenuity and ability to implement beautiful but practical features in their watches that have made them the most popular watch brand in the world today.

Patek Philippe Nautilus 5711 anchor

Luxury watches have a tendency to develop cult followings. These are the popular luxury watches that people are willing to wait in line for; not because they’re limited edition (because why people want those is a given). These watches are on every wish list because of reasons beyond simple supply and demand.

Rolex Submariner 116610LV

Photo courtesy of Rolex

Although most, if not all, Submariner models have a waiting list—no surprise considering it’s one of the most iconic divers on the market—there is one that stands above the rest when it comes to desirability.

Aptly nicknamed The Hulk because of its green cerachrom bezel and green sunburst dial reminiscent of the Marvel superhero, the unusual color of the Submariner 116610LV has catapulted it to the top of Rolex lovers’ must-have lists.

Jaeger LeCoultre Master Ultra Thin Perpetual

Photo courtesy of Jaeger LeCoultre

One of the most iconic models of JLC is the Master Ultra Thin, which sprung from the idea of creating ultra thin movements and timepieces that started the partnership of Antoine LeCoultre and Edmond Jaeger.

The main reason why the demand skyrocketed for this model, particularly the silver dial version, is the blockbuster movie “Dr. Strange” (sensing a theme here?). When Benedict Cumberbatch played the titular role, he wore this watch in a few pivotal scenes of the movie and, as Marvel is Marvel, people took notice. Cue cult status for the Master Ultra Thin.

A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Chronograph

Photo courtesy of A. Lange & Söhne

This particular piece features a flyback chronograph with a pulsometer dial, so generally speaking, the 1815 Chronograph is a traditional and straightforward watch. Simple? Not really. Flip the watch over and you’ll understand what the fuss is all about: the in-house caliber L951.5 in all its glory. Regarded as the most beautiful movement ever made, it looks like a miniature city viewed from above, truly a masterpiece.

IWC Pilot’s Watch Chronograph Edition “Le Petit Prince”

Photo courtesy of IWC

When you think of a pilot’s watch, the first brand that comes to mind is IWC. The large case and dial make for a very legible watch, and the chronograph function is a great addition to an already good looking timepiece.

However, the “Le Petit Prince” takes the original idea and takes it to a whole new level. Inspired by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s novel of the same name, and created for the benefit of his foundation, it features a blue sunburst dial, brown calfskin strap made by Santoni, and an engraved caseback featuring The Little Prince himself.

Audemars Piguet Royal Oak

Photo courtesy of Audemars Piguet

The design that gave birth to the luxury sports watch and saved mechanical watches from the quartz crisis. Designed by the godfather of watch designers, Gérald Genta, it made a surprising splash, considering it was only made of steel and had a simple time and date complication.

Patek Philippe Nautilus 5711

Photo courtesy of Patek Philippe

This watch is considered by many to be the perfect all-around watch. Its clamp down construction makes it possible for you to take it to the beach for a swim. Its clean lines mean you can wear it to a meeting. The slim case can be worn under a cuff for black tie events—but it’s still bold enough a statement when worn jeans and a plain shirt. All of this is backed up by its relevance in the rebirth of the mechanical watch industry and the birth of the luxury sports watch.

Rolex Cosmograph Daytona 116500LN

Photo Courtesy of Rolex

The Daytona needs no introduction. It’s arguably the most iconic Rolex line. Ever.

The reference no. 116500LN is the latest addition to the popular Daytona line, featuring a black cerachrom tachymeter bezel, a white dial, and a black subdial outer track. The color contrast is reminiscent of the vintage Daytona 6263, a popular choice for vintage Rolex collectors.

From Basic to Better

Understanding innovation in luxury watch materials first requires knowing what properties these materials bring to the table. Their properties are the starting point that innovations spring from. These are generally concerns of lightness, durability, resistance to corrosion or scratching, and aesthetics. Watch materials fall under five categories: metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and metalloids.

Panerai Luminor Marina 1950 3 days Automatic Titanio luxury watch materials

The Panerai Luminor Marina 1950 3 days Automatic Titanio uses a titanium case, which is half the weight of stainless steel, is corrosion-resistant, and anti-magnetic, and skin-friendly. 

Metals

For general engineering purposes and in watchmaking, metals are used for their strength, hardness, toughness, lightness, and durability. Metals bear heavy loads, resist high temperatures and pressures, endure a lot of wear and tear in cyclic loads, but where timepieces are concerned, these stresses and demands take place on a smaller, more human level. For example, Jacques Cousteau’s Rolex Submariner and Buzz Aldrin’s Omega Speedmaster only needed to be durable enough to undergo the pressures of undersea diving and the intense g-forces of space travel. As they are, metals and their properties already bring a lot to the watchmaking table.

Stainless steel is the workhorse of watchmaking metals. Alloyed with chromium, stainless steel forms a thin film, invisible to the human eye, that retards oxidation while maintaining a smooth finish on the surface. The material is likewise durable enough to accept a number of finishes: brushed, satin, matte, reflective, mirror, and so on. Lastly, stainless steel can endure the wear and tear of human use, lasting entire lifetimes.

Titanium offers additional improvements over stainless steel. First, it can bear up to five times the load ordinary steels can bear. Second, titanium weighs around half the weight of steel at the same volume. Thus a titanium watch case would offer the same durability as a stainless steel case but at a lighter weight. There are, however, certain stainless steel alloys that are more durable than titanium, but these are used for industrial purposes and hardly in watchmaking. Like stainless steel, titanium has an oxide layer that forms on its surface, making it both corrosion resistant and hypoallergenic—ideal for accessories.

Metallic properties and watch components

Flipping over a A. Lange & Sohne Saxonia, for example, would readily illustrate how metallic properties come into play in horology. The hand-polished, chamfered, or beveled parts all attest to the various metals malleability and ductility. The Glashutte waves and the circular, sunburst, and brushed finishes show how metals can, with expert skill, display a number of finishing touches that come together in one aesthetic effect.

Precious metals like gold, platinum, or sterling silver gain added hardness when electroplated with rhodium. By itself a precious metal with a high melting point and low malleability, rhodium is usually alloyed with nickel, palladium, and gold to become the white gold seen on many luxury timepieces. With sterling silver, it adds tarnish resistance and added shine. If used to set diamonds, its reflective qualities make them appear larger and to advantage.

Meanwhile, blued steel—seen on timepieces mostly as watch hands or screws—partially protects steel from oxidation by applying a surface layer of magnetite, the black oxide of iron. Chemical bluing creates a homogenous shade of blue throughout the metal’s surface; because horology requires some nuance from its materials, the preferred method is thermal bluing by hand. This involves laying the screws or watch hands on a tray, which is lined with brass filings to keep the temperature relatively constant, and heating the tray to around 220° C. The components acquire the blue shade to varying degrees—thinner areas acquire the blue shade more readily than thicker areas, resulting in several subtle shades of blues and purples.

A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Annual Calendar movement luxury watch materials

A. Lange & Söhne is known for its use of precious materials and the degree of finishing it gives all parts of the watch—including the parts that won’t be normally seen, such as in this 1815 Annual Calendar. 

Innovations in horological metals

A few years ago, tantalum was a dark horse in the watch case materials category. It is now generating a fair degree of interest, with its appearance on several timepieces: Hublot’s Big Bang Tantalum Mat, Audemars Piguet’s Royal Oak Leo Messi Edition, and the Panerai Luminor Marina series, among others. As a rare and hard metal, highly corrosion resistant and bioinert, tantalum lends itself well to haute horology. Aesthetically, a timepiece with a tantalum case or bezel would eschew the usual shine of other precious metals and convey a stealthy, matte-gray instead.

Ceramics

While this category includes non-metal inorganic compounds like glass, diamond & sapphire crystals, and graphite, this also includes engineering ceramics that have been used in watch cases and other watch components. Ceramics are the hardest class of materials known. They are around three to four times stronger than stainless steel. Ceramics resist wear and tear easily, maintaining a smooth surface and low friction for a long time. They are also lighter than stainless steel or titanium. With their low density—as low as that of aluminum—and their high hardness, ceramics are an ideal material for watchmaking.

However, ceramics are prone to breaking when hit with a strong enough impact. Ceramics are strong when they come under compression, but their strength is reduced by up to 15 times when under tension; ceramics are not as flexible and ductile as metals. All the same, timepieces with ceramic cases or components are less likely to encounter high-force impacts as say, ceramic aerospace components or industrial tools. Used in a timepiece, ceramics are guaranteed to last several lifetimes, maintaining their smooth finish and low-friction operations.

Rolex Submariner luxury watch materials

The Rolex Submariner uses a ceramic insert, called Cerachrom, for its unidirectional rotating bezel. The material is extremely hard, corrosion-resistant, scratch proof, and its color is unaffected by ultraviolet rays.

Innovations in horological ceramics

Rado set the precedent by being the first to use engineered ceramics for its timepieces. This blends oxides, carbides, nitrates, and zirconium to create a durable, scratch-resistant material that can be shaped into watch cases.

It is for these properties that ceramics find use in many luxury watch bezels, as seen on several Rolex lines, Hublot’s Big Bang, Panerai’s Luminor 1950 series, Omega’s Dark Side of the Moon—all timepieces that require the durability and resistance of ceramics to keep up with their wearer’s active lifestyles.

The Roger Dubuis Excalibur Aventador S is a perfect example of what can be done using forged carbon. It possesses shapes that cannot be molded into place using traditional methods. 

Composites

Carbon fiber was a big hit when it was first used in watches. It was high-tech and advanced, lightweight and strong, and the depth of the checkerboard pattern was mesmerizing to look at. But manufacturing processes have changed. Now, we have forged carbon, a material that looks similar to granite because of its manufacturing process. Instead of layering carbon sheets on top of a mold and injecting resin like a traditional carbon weave, forged carbon is made out of fiber paste mixed with resin squeezed to produce any shape or form possible. It is strong all around but may not be as strong at a specific direction like traditional carbon; the carbon weave can be tuned to be strong at a specific direction. However, forged carbon is easier and cheaper to produce.

The Patek Philippe Aquanaut Travel Time Advanced Research is a special release of Patek Philippe to showcase their craftsmanship using different materials, including Silicon, which is used on the escape wheel and pallet fork.

Metalloids

The latest innovation in watchmaking is the use of a metalloid called, Silicon. Not to be confused with Silicone, which is a liquid or rubber-like synthetic material. Silicon, on the other hand, is a natural element that has both metallic and non-metallic properties. It’s the 2nd most abundant element in the Earth’s crust and it is used in bricks, glass, & in electronic devices. So you might be wondering what use does Silicon have in watches. Well, it plays an integral part in the movement, specifically the balance spring, lever and anchor wheel. It’s anti-magnetic, corrosion resistant, unaffected by temperature changes, generates very little friction, and can be shaped into any form.

This piece was originally published in the print version of Lucerne Luxe Magazine, and condensed for brevity.

Fighting words, to be sure, but we’re calling it: These are the watches that are guaranteed to elevate your look, no matter your personal aesthetic.

  1. The Dress Watch

Breguet Classique Chronométrie 7727

For those events that require the wearing of a suit. Usually classic in design, thin, and elegant, it’s worn on occasions when you need to tuck the watch into your sleeve (e.g. a black tie event). Black leather straps are ideal, and since most men consider the watch their only accessory or form of jewelry, is preferably in gold or platinum.

  1. The Divers Watch

Omega Seamaster Ploprof 1200m

There are more than 7,000 islands in the Philippines, so a diver’s watch is a must for the beach lover. After all, wearing a dress watch to a resort makes just about as much sense as wearing a pair of black leather oxfords with boardshorts. This watch needs to have a rotating bezel, a screw down crown, and a helium escape valve. Other features are big, luminous markers, and preferably a rubber strap.

  1. The Chronograph Watch

Hublot Big Bang Ferrari Unico Magic Gold

It’s a cliché because it’s true: Men who love watches are (usually) just as crazy about cars. It comes as no surprise, then, that auto-themed watches are some of the most popular in the market. These typically feature chronographs that can measure elapses time, and have design features inspired by supercars. Bonus points if you get your hands on a brand collaboration.

  1. The Work Watch

IWC Schaffhausen Portugieser Automatic

Yes, everyone should have one, but the watch you choose depends on the job you have, and, realistically, correlates to the size of your paycheck. It should reflect your lifestyle and your daily activities: Are you in surgery all the time? Are you always on the field? Are you always at client meetings? Every industry will have different preferences in brand, style and function, but it should always be automatic and have calendar functionalities.

  1. The Travel Watch

Vacheron Constantin Overseas World Time

Whether you’re travelling for work or leisure, going from one time zone to another is unavoidable at some point, and you don’t want to (or can’t) miss that important flight or appointment. There are three choices for the jetsetter: GMT, Dual Time, or Worldtime. Take your pick.

  1. A Discreet Watch
Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Classic Duoface Small Second

There are many occasions being tasteful and discreet is necessary. This is the watch you wear when subtlety is the name of the game and you’d rather not make too extravagant a statement.

  1. The Weekend Watch

Panerai 1950 PCYC Regatta 3 Days Chrono Flyback Automatic Titanio

We’ve covered beach weekends, or the weekends that involve taking the Ferrari out with your friends. This watch is the go-to when you’re hitting the clubs or the bars. This is the watch to wear when you’re channeling a laid-back sort of cool, perhaps in the company of people who actually care about what the Met Gala theme this year was. This is the watch that guarantees you’ll get numbers.

  1. A Rolex

Rolex GMT-Master II

Every collection deserves—no, demands—a Rolex. Due to its popularity, it’s quite rare to find someone who doesn’t know about these classic models. A Rolex is also a great conversation starter, and history has proven that these conversations lead to a good many deals being made. If you already own one, you know what we mean.

  1. A Complication Watch

Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore Tourbillon Chronograph

The apex of every collection. Basically, a jaw-dropping watch that probably has a price tag with seven or more figures. From a perpetual calendar and tourbillions to minute repeaters, this is the type of watch that gets the attention only of those who are in the know. Honestly, this watch alone is enough to get you VIP treatment in a Michelin-starred restaurant, nightlong bottle service at a club with an impossible guest list, or the benefit of being bumped up a waitlist for a highly coveted, well, anything, really.

  1. An Heirloom Watch

Patek Philippe 5208R

Preferably one from your father or grandfather, whom you saw wearing the watch while you were growing up. Nostalgia plays a big part in determining the value of this watch: it’s special because it triggers memories of the person who used to own it. Now that it’s yours, it turns you into a custodian of tradition, of a legacy, so start paying more attention to what wisdom you’ll be passing on to the next generation. And take care of that watch, yeah?

Rolex and Wimbledon: The Perfect Match

One epic rally played by the greatest tennis players in the world. Legends have made history on the prestigious grass courts inspiring new generations of champions. Rolex marks 40 years of tennis excellence since it became The Official Timekeeper of The Championships, Wimbledon in 1978. Discover more on https://on.rolex.com/2yJ1zNv

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