Lucerne Luxe Magazine | Luxury Watch Articles, News, and Videos

swiss watches philippines

luxury watch articles

rolex philippines news

tudor philippines news

omega watch philippines news

watches philippines
luxury watches philippines
patek philippe philippines
ADVERTISEMENT
  • Discover more brands
    on the Lucerne Luxe site.

    EXPLORE NOW


Discover more brands
on our corporate site.


  • Shop the best vintage watches
    in the Lucerne Shop

    SHOP NOW

Shop the best vintage watches
in the Lucerne Shop

Tag: Roger Dubuis

 

The Lunar New Year marks the beginning of the Year of the Earth Pig. Looking for a dose of luck? Traditionally, its recommended that we wear colors associated with the elements of fire and metal to reap the benefits of earth.

For the unitiated, the rationale lies in how fire creates earth—in the way that fire creates ash—and earth bears metal.

Traditionally, the colors for fire are tones of red, orange, and pink, while for metal, it’s the more straightforward white and gold.

Even if you aren’t a believer in the idea of wearing “lucky” colors, it’s undeniable that certain colors have specific effects on us. What colors we choose to wear or surround ourselves with can affect our emotions and our behavior, which, in turn, can affect our daily lives.

So whether you’re feeling lucky, or don’t even believe in the concept of luck, here’s a list of beautiful watches in these recommended hues.

Red

Red has long been associated with Chinese culture and regarded as a symbol of happiness and prosperity. It’s the color of the iconic lanterns during Chinese New Year and other big celebrations, the color of ampao envelopes containing money given during holidays, as well as the color of the couple’s clothes on their wedding day. It’s also the color most closely associated with the fire element.

  • Breguet
  • Chopard
  • Hublot
  • Jaeger-LeCoultre
  • Rolex
  • Breguet Marie-Antoinette “Dentelle” Ref. GJE16BB20.8924R01

    Establish yourself as a red queen with this watch in the Marie Antoinette jewelry set. Its red strap accentuates the singular ruby set among its diamonds.

  • Chopard Imperiale 40mm Ref. 384240-5002

    Prefer the baguette cut for your jewels? This watch features it in spades with rubies on the bezel and diamonds on the dial.

  • Hublot Big Bang Unico Red Magic

    As a material, ceramic lends itself to even the most intense shade of red, making this new piece the perfect addition to the Big Bang—and your—collection.

  • Jaeger-LeCoultre Rendez-Vous Celestial Ref. 3482560

    We know it isn’t the same 12 zodiac signs, but it’s in red and has the constellations of the Northern hemisphere on it and we just couldn’t resist.

  • Rolex Day-Date 36 Ref. 118139

    If you’re looking for a subtler statement, then this model’s subdued cherry dial with a matching leather strap is the pick for you.

Pink

The color pink isn’t as significant in Chinese culture as red is, but as a shade of red, it is still associated with fire. If you’re looking for something a little less vibrant and forward as red is, pink is the way to go. (Valentine’s Day is also coming up, a celebration in which pink is pretty crucial, though that’s a story for another time.)

  • Omega
  • Patek Philippe
  • Roger Dubuis
  • Rolex
  • Omega Constellation Co-Axial 27mm 123.25.27.20.57.004

    Channel your inner wild side with this piece’s iconic “Griffes” or claws on the bezel and the coral mother-of-pearl dial resembling fur.

  • Patek Philippe Calatrava Ref. 4899/900G

    Have an avian fascination? This bejewelled Calatrava’s perfect for you. A feather motif is engraved on the mother-of-pearl dial as well as the hands, and is joined by staggered-set diamonds and pink sapphires.

  • Roger Dubuis Blossom Velvet Pink

    Pablo Neruda once wrote, “I love you as the plant that doesn’t bloom but carries / the light of those flowers, hidden, within itself,” but this watch certainly doesn’t hide its flowers, and for that, we love it.

  • Rolex GMT-Master II Ref. 126715CHNR

    The GMT-Master II in Everose gold with the two-tone brown and black bezel takes two neutrals and meshes it in an iconic model… perfect for the man who prefers rootbeer to Pepsi, so to speak.

Orange

Another color that is tied to the element of fire is orange. The image of the mandarin orange is also a symbol of good fortune, exchanged between family and friends or displayed to invite luck into your environs. So while you might not want to carry a literal orange around with you, a predominantly orange watch just might do the trick.

  • Audemars Piguet
  • Ball
  • Chopard
  • Zenith
  • Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Offshore Selfwinding Chronograph Ref. 26231ST.ZZ.D070CA.01

    Perceived as young, loud, and impactful, orange has always been viewed as a more difficult color to style. But Audemars Piguet takes this hue, integrates it into an appropriately sporty watch, and turns it into a statement for your wrist.

  • Ball Engineer Master II Diver TMT Ref. DT1020A-P1-BEORF

    Always wondered why mechanical dive watches never had thermometers? Wonder no more with this cool, glow-in-the-dark watch.

  • Omega Planet Ocean 600M GMT Ref. 232.93.44.22.99.001

    This limited edition timepiece sports a ceramic bezel in an orange so vibrant you can almost taste the citrus.

  • Zenith Defy El Primero 21 Swizz Beatz Ref. 49.9003.9004/76.R591

    If you happen to follow the music industry, specifically that of rappers’, this particular watch is a rare treat. Bonus points if you love diamonds and orange.

White

White is the main color associated with the metal element in the Five Elements theory, and represents the yang force in Chinese philosophy. Besides symbolizing brightness, purity, and fulfilment, white is a color that can work with virtually anything.

  • Audemars Piguet
  • Baume et Mercier
  • Girard-Perregaux
  • Maurice Lacroix
  • Omega
  • Patek Philippe
  • Audemars Piguet Royal Oak Quartz Ref. 67652BC.ZZ.1265BC.01

    This watch has a more than a thousand hundred brilliant-cut diamonds that’ll shine during even the darkest of nights.

  • Baume et Mercier Petite Promesse Ref. 10289

    Looking for a watch that’s a little different? This timepiece, with a classic mother-of-pearl dial surrounded by a diamond-set bezel switches it up with a wraparound stainless steel bracelet.

  • Girard-Perregaux Cat’s Eye Plum Blossom Ref. 80484D11A701-HK7A

    This watch has us grinning like Cheshire cats, with the seconds hand appearing as a charming plum blossom.

  • Maurice Lacroix Aikon Automatic Ref. AI6008-SS002-130-1

    The silver sun-brushed Clous de Paris dial with the Rhodium-plated, white SLN indexes and hands is perfect for a simple, everyday look.

  • Omega Speedmaster Moonwatch White Side of the Moon

    Carry the radiant moon on your wrist with this white ceramic watch.

  • Patek Philippe Nautilus Ref. 5711/1A-011

    The Nautilus has always been known for its more iconic version with the blue dial, but we think the version with the white dial is just as handsome.

Gold

Last but most definitely not the least is the metal that makes the world go round: gold. It doesn’t matter which culture you’re more familiar with, because this metal universally represents riches, fortune, and good luck. It’s often paired with red in Chinese New Year. Of course, too much gold can be a little bit of, erm, a statement— so here are a few of our favorite, tasteful watches.

  • Audemars Piguet
  • Breitling
  • Chopard
  • Louis Erard
  • Omega
  • Patek Philippe
  • Rolex
  • Vacheron Constantin
  • Audemars Piguet Royal Oak “Jumbo” Extra-thin Ref. 15202BA.OO.1240BA.02

    If you love bling, this yellow gold-on-gold watch will prove to be a great addition to your collection.

  • Breitling Chronomat 44 Steel & Gold – Golden Sun Ref. CB0110121H1C1

    This watch, aptly named the Golden Sun, shines brightly. You’ll even see it glinting during deep dives, down to an impressive 500m.

  • Chopard Happy Diamonds Icons Watch Ref. 209421-5001

    Encased in transparent sapphire crystal, five diamonds dance around the guilloché dial in this charming watch.

  • Louis Erard 01811PR11.BMA84

    This watch utilizes the PVD (physical vapor deposition) process, making the rose gold coating on the watch last years and years and years.

  • Omega Speedmaster ’57 Co-Axial Chronograph 41.5mm Ref. 331.50.42.51.02.001

    Feeling nostalgic? This watch comes from a collection that’s been reimagined as an even better version of the 1957 original.

  • Patek Philippe Twenty~4 Ref. 7300/1200R-010

    Fit for the woman-on-the-go, this rose gold watch features a silver dial with a finish that resembles wild shantung silk.

  • Rolex Oyster Perpetual Datejust 41 Ref. 126333

    Feel opulent with this watch’s champagne-colored dial and its use of Yellow Rolesor, a combination of Oystersteel and 18 carat yellow gold.

  • Vacheron Constantin Traditionelle Small Model Ref. 25557/Q01R-9277

    At 30mm, this watch is for the tiniest of wrists. Like they always say, the best things in life come in small packages.

Here’s Why The Crown Is The Unsung Hero Of Watchmaking (And Why Rolex Wears The Crown) (via Quill & Pad)

  • When was the last time you thought about your watch crown? Ooooh-ed and Aaaaahhh-ed over a crown innovation? There’s so much more to this tiny part of watchmaking, though, and its functions—and aesthetics—have evolved over the centuries.

Your Supercar and Watch Now Have More in Common Than You Ever Imagined (via Robb Report)

  • Carbon fiber is taking the next step in its evolution as a material, transcending simple aesthetics, pushing watch designers to think of it in new ways, and even challenging the watch industry’s criteria for certification.

 

Breitling’s CEO Georges Kern On Strategy To Survive In The Digital World (via Indonesia Tatler)

  • If you’re on Instagram and have a penchant for timepieces, chances are you follow Breitling CEO Georges Kern. Here, he shares his thoughts on the value of watch fairs, speaking to a new audience, and melding history and modernity.

 

Minimalism may be in, but watchmakers will always take pride in showing off their artistry through visually striking pieces. From hand engraving and sculpting to unique jewelry settings and enamel art, artisans apply all kinds of techniques to turn timepieces into wearable works of art. These are the watches for people who aren’t afraid to make a statement.

Roger Dubuis Excalibur Knights of the Round Table III

 

Arthurian legend meets 21st century art in this stunning piece from Roger Dubuis. King Arthur’s valiant knights come to life as pink-gold low poly figurines who point their glistening swords at an Avalon-inspired table sculpted from solid blue enamel blocks. This scene is framed by an imposing pink-gold case with a fluted bezel.

The Excalibur Knights of the Round Table III houses a self-winding Calibre RD 821 with a 48-hour power reserve.

 

Jaeger-LeCoultre Rendez-Vous Celestial

 

 

Astrology lovers and New Age romantics will love this timepiece, which features a celestial map tracking the constellations’ movements across a hand-painted lapis lazuli sky. Its deep blue and purple hues take inspiration from the aurora borealis, and are complemented by a bezel set with gorgeous sapphires and diamonds. A star running along the circumference of the dial acts as a rendez-vous indicator—just use the crown to set it to the appointed hour of your meeting.

The Rendez-Vous Celestial runs on a Jaeger-LeCoultre 809/1 automatic movement with a 40-hour power reserve.

 

 

Patek Philippe 5077/101 “Birds and Clouds”

 

Birds take flight against a backdrop of white gold clouds and a blue lacquer sky in this piece from Patek Philippe’s latest Rare Handcrafts collection. A guilloché sunburst radiating from 6 o’clock adds depth to the dial, while hand-engraved feathers adorn rose gold dauphin hands. Diamond indices complement the bejeweled bezel and lugs.

One can admire the caliber 240 ultra-thin self-winding movement through the sapphire-crystal case back. The movement has a power reserve of at least 48 hours.

Rolex Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona in Everose Gold

The Rolex “Rainbow” Daytona has been much coveted since it was revealed at Baselworld 2018. Apart from its eye-catching sapphire-encrusted bezel, its dial features 11 baguette-cut sapphire hour markers to match. Its lugs and crown guard are set with 56 brilliant-cut diamonds as well, and its case and bracelet are made of 18 ct Everose gold. We particularly like the unique finish on the pink gold crystal chronograph counters.

Like any other Rolex, this timepiece isn’t just about looks: its Oyster case is guaranteed waterproof up to 100 meters or 330 feet, ands its winding crown is fitted with a Triplock triple waterproofness system. The Rainbow Daytona runs on a Calibre 4130 self-winding mechanical chronograph movement with a 72-hour power reserve.

 

 

Vacheron Constantin Metiers d’Art Les Aerostiers Bagnols 1785

 

Long before the Wright Brothers invented the first successful airplane, the people of France dreamed of flight. Vacheron Constantin Métiers d’Art Aérostiers collection celebrates five historical hot air balloon flights undertaken in France in the 1780s. Our favorite? The Bagnols 1785, which features an ornate hot air balloon hand-engraved and microsculpted from yellow and white gold. It appears to float against a whimsical plique-à-jour enamel dial in various shades of blue.

Its disc displays include hours, minutes, day of the week, and date, all run by the self-winding Manufacture Calibre 2460 G4/1. It has approximately 40 hours of power reserve and is water resistant to 3 bar or 30 meters.

 

 

Hublot Big Bang Mr. Brainwash

 

Not all maximalist watches need to be covered in glittering jewels. In 2015, street artist Mr. Brainwash (also known as Thierry Guetta) worked his magic on a Hublot Big Bang Unico 45, resulting in an acrylic paint-splattered timepiece that was literally a wearable work of art. Needless to say, we don’t recommend you do the same to your watches.

Audemars Piguet Diamond Outrage


Nothing says maximalist like a cuff watch that looks like it could cut you. The third and final piece in Audemars Piguet’s Haute Joaillerie trilogy, Diamond Outrage is for the fabulous woman who is not to be messed with. Its bracelet is adorned with striking diamond-encrusted spikes of varying sizes, resulting in an explosion of glittering stalactites on the wrist.

Its quartz movement is housed in an 18-carat white gold bracelet entirely set with diamonds, with a mirror polished dial and blackened gold hands.

 

 

Breguet Be Crazy

 

As the house that created the very first wristwatch for the Queen of Naples in 1810, and counted Marie Antoinette, Empress Josephine, and Queen Victoria among its clientele, it’s no surprise that Breguet continues to produce watches fit for royalty. Case in point: the Breguet Be Crazy wrist watch, which features over 70 carats of baguette diamonds. Here’s the breakdown: Over 1,000 mobile diamonds set into the caseband, 57 diamonds in the flange, 133 diamonds in the dial, and over 200 diamonds set into the bracelet.

The case, dial, and bracelet are made of 18-carat white gold. With such an impressive watch, Breguet could easily have gotten away with using a quartz movement. However, the Be Crazy watch houses a self-winding Breguet Cal. 586/1, which has a 38-hour power reserve and can be viewed through a sapphire-crystal caseback.

 

 

From Basic to Better

Understanding innovation in luxury watch materials first requires knowing what properties these materials bring to the table. Their properties are the starting point that innovations spring from. These are generally concerns of lightness, durability, resistance to corrosion or scratching, and aesthetics. Watch materials fall under five categories: metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and metalloids.

Panerai Luminor Marina 1950 3 days Automatic Titanio luxury watch materials

The Panerai Luminor Marina 1950 3 days Automatic Titanio uses a titanium case, which is half the weight of stainless steel, is corrosion-resistant, and anti-magnetic, and skin-friendly. 

Metals

For general engineering purposes and in watchmaking, metals are used for their strength, hardness, toughness, lightness, and durability. Metals bear heavy loads, resist high temperatures and pressures, endure a lot of wear and tear in cyclic loads, but where timepieces are concerned, these stresses and demands take place on a smaller, more human level. For example, Jacques Cousteau’s Rolex Submariner and Buzz Aldrin’s Omega Speedmaster only needed to be durable enough to undergo the pressures of undersea diving and the intense g-forces of space travel. As they are, metals and their properties already bring a lot to the watchmaking table.

Stainless steel is the workhorse of watchmaking metals. Alloyed with chromium, stainless steel forms a thin film, invisible to the human eye, that retards oxidation while maintaining a smooth finish on the surface. The material is likewise durable enough to accept a number of finishes: brushed, satin, matte, reflective, mirror, and so on. Lastly, stainless steel can endure the wear and tear of human use, lasting entire lifetimes.

Titanium offers additional improvements over stainless steel. First, it can bear up to five times the load ordinary steels can bear. Second, titanium weighs around half the weight of steel at the same volume. Thus a titanium watch case would offer the same durability as a stainless steel case but at a lighter weight. There are, however, certain stainless steel alloys that are more durable than titanium, but these are used for industrial purposes and hardly in watchmaking. Like stainless steel, titanium has an oxide layer that forms on its surface, making it both corrosion resistant and hypoallergenic—ideal for accessories.

Metallic properties and watch components

Flipping over a A. Lange & Sohne Saxonia, for example, would readily illustrate how metallic properties come into play in horology. The hand-polished, chamfered, or beveled parts all attest to the various metals malleability and ductility. The Glashutte waves and the circular, sunburst, and brushed finishes show how metals can, with expert skill, display a number of finishing touches that come together in one aesthetic effect.

Precious metals like gold, platinum, or sterling silver gain added hardness when electroplated with rhodium. By itself a precious metal with a high melting point and low malleability, rhodium is usually alloyed with nickel, palladium, and gold to become the white gold seen on many luxury timepieces. With sterling silver, it adds tarnish resistance and added shine. If used to set diamonds, its reflective qualities make them appear larger and to advantage.

Meanwhile, blued steel—seen on timepieces mostly as watch hands or screws—partially protects steel from oxidation by applying a surface layer of magnetite, the black oxide of iron. Chemical bluing creates a homogenous shade of blue throughout the metal’s surface; because horology requires some nuance from its materials, the preferred method is thermal bluing by hand. This involves laying the screws or watch hands on a tray, which is lined with brass filings to keep the temperature relatively constant, and heating the tray to around 220° C. The components acquire the blue shade to varying degrees—thinner areas acquire the blue shade more readily than thicker areas, resulting in several subtle shades of blues and purples.

A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Annual Calendar movement luxury watch materials

A. Lange & Söhne is known for its use of precious materials and the degree of finishing it gives all parts of the watch—including the parts that won’t be normally seen, such as in this 1815 Annual Calendar. 

Innovations in horological metals

A few years ago, tantalum was a dark horse in the watch case materials category. It is now generating a fair degree of interest, with its appearance on several timepieces: Hublot’s Big Bang Tantalum Mat, Audemars Piguet’s Royal Oak Leo Messi Edition, and the Panerai Luminor Marina series, among others. As a rare and hard metal, highly corrosion resistant and bioinert, tantalum lends itself well to haute horology. Aesthetically, a timepiece with a tantalum case or bezel would eschew the usual shine of other precious metals and convey a stealthy, matte-gray instead.

Ceramics

While this category includes non-metal inorganic compounds like glass, diamond & sapphire crystals, and graphite, this also includes engineering ceramics that have been used in watch cases and other watch components. Ceramics are the hardest class of materials known. They are around three to four times stronger than stainless steel. Ceramics resist wear and tear easily, maintaining a smooth surface and low friction for a long time. They are also lighter than stainless steel or titanium. With their low density—as low as that of aluminum—and their high hardness, ceramics are an ideal material for watchmaking.

However, ceramics are prone to breaking when hit with a strong enough impact. Ceramics are strong when they come under compression, but their strength is reduced by up to 15 times when under tension; ceramics are not as flexible and ductile as metals. All the same, timepieces with ceramic cases or components are less likely to encounter high-force impacts as say, ceramic aerospace components or industrial tools. Used in a timepiece, ceramics are guaranteed to last several lifetimes, maintaining their smooth finish and low-friction operations.

Rolex Submariner luxury watch materials

The Rolex Submariner uses a ceramic insert, called Cerachrom, for its unidirectional rotating bezel. The material is extremely hard, corrosion-resistant, scratch proof, and its color is unaffected by ultraviolet rays.

Innovations in horological ceramics

Rado set the precedent by being the first to use engineered ceramics for its timepieces. This blends oxides, carbides, nitrates, and zirconium to create a durable, scratch-resistant material that can be shaped into watch cases.

It is for these properties that ceramics find use in many luxury watch bezels, as seen on several Rolex lines, Hublot’s Big Bang, Panerai’s Luminor 1950 series, Omega’s Dark Side of the Moon—all timepieces that require the durability and resistance of ceramics to keep up with their wearer’s active lifestyles.

The Roger Dubuis Excalibur Aventador S is a perfect example of what can be done using forged carbon. It possesses shapes that cannot be molded into place using traditional methods. 

Composites

Carbon fiber was a big hit when it was first used in watches. It was high-tech and advanced, lightweight and strong, and the depth of the checkerboard pattern was mesmerizing to look at. But manufacturing processes have changed. Now, we have forged carbon, a material that looks similar to granite because of its manufacturing process. Instead of layering carbon sheets on top of a mold and injecting resin like a traditional carbon weave, forged carbon is made out of fiber paste mixed with resin squeezed to produce any shape or form possible. It is strong all around but may not be as strong at a specific direction like traditional carbon; the carbon weave can be tuned to be strong at a specific direction. However, forged carbon is easier and cheaper to produce.

The Patek Philippe Aquanaut Travel Time Advanced Research is a special release of Patek Philippe to showcase their craftsmanship using different materials, including Silicon, which is used on the escape wheel and pallet fork.

Metalloids

The latest innovation in watchmaking is the use of a metalloid called, Silicon. Not to be confused with Silicone, which is a liquid or rubber-like synthetic material. Silicon, on the other hand, is a natural element that has both metallic and non-metallic properties. It’s the 2nd most abundant element in the Earth’s crust and it is used in bricks, glass, & in electronic devices. So you might be wondering what use does Silicon have in watches. Well, it plays an integral part in the movement, specifically the balance spring, lever and anchor wheel. It’s anti-magnetic, corrosion resistant, unaffected by temperature changes, generates very little friction, and can be shaped into any form.

This piece was originally published in the print version of Lucerne Luxe Magazine, and condensed for brevity.

  • Shop the best vintage watches
    in the Lucerne Shop

    SHOP NOW


SHOP THE BEST VINTAGE WATCHES
IN THE LUCERNE SHOP

NEWSLETTER